About Jessica

 

Jessica Schiermeister is a dramaturg, director, actor, and instructor currently living in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She holds both a Master of Fine Arts (2014) and a Master of Letters (2013) in Shakespeare and Performance from Mary Baldwin College (now University) in Staunton, Virginia. She graduated cum laude in 2011 from Waldorf College (now University) in Forest City, Iowa with a Bachelor of Arts in Theatre and minors in Shakespeare and Humanities.

Her academic credits include the Andrew Gurr Award for Outstanding Thesis (Mary Baldwin, 2013) for her M.Litt thesis “‘Youths in Petticoats’: The Early Modern Boy Actor, the All-Male Stage, and Female Performance,” participation in the Early Modern Inversions panel at the South Atlantic Modern Language Association (2015), participation in the Shakespearean Performance panel at the American Society for Theatre Research conference (2013), and plenary presentation at the Blackfriars Conference (2013). Jessica is a member of the Shakespeare Association of America and the Literary Managers and Dramaturgs of the Americas.

Dramaturg credits include Macbeth (Four County Players), Fuente OvejunaDr. Faustus, and The Circle: A Devised Piece (Rogue Shakespeare), Margaret: A Tyger’s Heart (Mary Baldwin), Much Ado About NothingWild Goose Chase, Pericles, and As You Like It (American Shakespeare Center Theatre Camp), and Much Ado About Nothing (Waldorf).

Directing credits include Saint Joan (Sweet Tea Shakespeare), Much Ado About Nothing and The Second Shepherd’s Play (Waldorf), Fools (North Iowa Community High School), and The Shakespeare Project (assistant director, Benton Community High School).

Acting credits include Luciana in The Comedy of Errors (Pittsburgh Shakespeare in the Parks), Sir Andrew Aguecheek in Twelfth Night and Dionyza in Pericles (Hoosier Shakes), Richard in Richard II (Rogue Shakespeare), Moth and Katherine in Love’s Labour’s Lost (Mary Baldwin), Olga in Three Sisters (Waldorf), Katherine in The Taming of the Shrew (Waldorf), and Cecily Cardew in The Importance of Being Earnest (Waldorf).